A Quilted Lingerie Bag

comments (2) April 7th, 2008     

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MaryRay Mary Ray, contributor
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This sweet lingerie bag is the ultimate feminine accessory.
In three rows of six patches each, alternately lay out your quilt squares, then sew pieces together in three long rows.
When you press seam allowances to one side, alternating the direction of each row will greatly reduce bulk.
This sweet lingerie bag is the ultimate feminine accessory.

This sweet lingerie bag is the ultimate feminine accessory.

Photo: Mary Ray

I’m so in love with this project. It’s sweet, useful, and great fun to do. It makes a great gift and teaches a lot about basic quilting. Start by making a small one-patch quilt, then add some seams and a bow.

What You’ll Need:
Sewing machine
Iron
Ruler
Cutting and marking tools
Straight pins
Fabric:
Two compatible fabrics for the top, 1/4 yard of one, 1/2 yard of the other (I chose a couple of great cotton prints from my local quilt shop. I recommend cotton if you haven’t sewn much before because it’s so easy to work with.)

1/2 yard fabric for the backing (I used a silk taffeta remnant from a home dec store. The taffeta is also easy to work with and it just says, “lingerie.” But, cotton will work just as well and, if you want to use the same fabric for the backing and half the patches, get an additional 1/4 yard.)

Quilt batting, a 14" x 26" piece
Thread for sewing and coordinating thread for quilting
Ribbon: 1/2 yard of double-faced satin or grosgrain

You may not ever wash this bag, but if you think you might it’s a good idea to prewash your fabric first and here’s why: the fabric may shrink a bit; some fabrics may loose some color and bleed on neighboring pieces (this rarely happens with the cottons you find nowadays at the quilt shops, but it’s better to be safe than sorry); some fabrics have sizing in them to give them extra body and washing that out makes them easier to sew.

First make the quilt

1. Cut 18 4-1/2-inch squares (9 from each fabric). Cut a 14 x 26-inch piece for the backing and 2 long strips 24 x 2 inches and 2 shorter strips 13 x 2 inches for the binding.

Accuracy is important when you’re piecing a quilt, so when you cut the pieces, be sure to start with a straight line across the edge of the fabric. It’s tempting to start from the selvage, but you’ll want to evenly trim that away because it may add bulk and cause some distortion in the seams.

2. Lay out the cut squares alternately in 3 rows of 6 patches each. Sew the pieces together in the three long rows using a 1/4-inch seam allowance.


In three rows of six patches each, alternately lay out your quilt squares, then sew pieces together in three long rows.

3. Press the seam allowances to one side, alternating the direction in each row. This reduces the bulk when you sew the rows together.


When you press seam allowances to one side, alternating the direction of each row will greatly reduce bulk.

4. Pin and sew the rows together, matching the seams first. Piecing is all about intersecting points, and you want them to meet as closely and neatly as possible.

5. Stack the backing (wrong side up), batting, and top (right side up) together. The backing and batting are larger and will extend about an inch all around. Press everything together smoothly with an iron.

6. Mark the quilting lines on the top with a marker that will not leave a permanent line. You can use any pattern you like, but a simple grid is effective and easy to do.

To make the grid, place the ruler at an angle across the width of the quilt at about the center and draw the first line. Continue marking lines 2 inches apart on each side of the center line. Pin between the lines to hold the layers together.


It's super easy to mark quilting lines in a simple grid pattern, or you can make any pattern you like.


7. Now you’re ready to quilt! Thread your machine with the quilting thread and set the stitch length to about 3mm, which is a little longer than the standard stitch length. Always start by sewing the line in the center of the quilt first and working out in both directions. This prevents the layers from stretching and distorting as you stitch. Sew all the lines, press again, then mark the lines across the grid. Sew and press.


Have you noticed that I press a lot? That’s because pressing can make or break a project. Sewing is easier when you press as you go, and the end results are so much better.

8. Neatly trim away the excess batting and backing.


Trim away excess batting and backing.

 


After trimming, your quilt piece should look something like this.


9. To make the binding, fold the long and short fabric strips lengthwise, wrong sides together. Sew the binding to each long side first, placing the binding on the backing side, raw edges matching. Pin. Sew in place with a 1/4-inch seam. Press the binding toward the seam allowance, fold it over the seam allowance, and press again, making sure to cover the original stitching line. Pin in place, and stitch along the fold. To bind the short ends, pin the strips in place folding in 1/2 inch at each end, and complete as above.


To make the binding, fold the long and short fabric strips lengthwise, wrong sides together.

 


Fold binding over the seam allowance and press to cover the original stitching line. Pin in place and stitch along the fold.

 


Pin and sew sides together just outside previous stitching line.

Sew the bag together

10. Fold up the quilt piece 10 inches from one end, pin, and sew the sides together just outside the previous stitching line. To secure the seam at the opening, sew back and forth a few stitches to create a bar tack.


Bind short ends by pinning strips in place, folding in 1/2 inch at each end. Complete as in step nine.

11. Cut the ribbon in half and sew one half to the back side at the center of the flap, folding in the end to cover the raw edge of the ribbon. Sew the other piece of ribbon in place where the flap meets the bag.

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Comments (2)

Isabellas_Quilts writes: You're Instructions are very easy to follow !
Thank You.
This would make a nice mother's day or even a great bridal gift with the addition of some special lingerie made out of her favorite fabric with a small bottle of her favorite perfume.
Wouldn't hurt to make a few of these up ahead of time for birthday's or graduation. Great Idea.
Posted: 11:33 pm on May 6th
o0peachblossom0o writes: super sweet quilted bag, darling! Nice instructions and easy to make... mine didn't look quite as good, but close! Thanks!
Posted: 6:30 am on April 25th
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