Dare to Make It! Crochet-Along: Week 4

comments (6) November 5th, 2008     

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LindaPermann Linda Permann, contributor
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To make a half double crochet 2 together (hdc2tog), (yarn over and insert the hook in the next stitch, yarn over, and draw up a loop) twice, then yarn over and pull the loop through all 3 loops on the hook.
To begin shaping, slipstitch in the first 3 stitches. To make a slipstitch, insert the hook in the stitch, yarn over, and draw the loop through both the stitch and the loop on your hook.
In subsequent rows, skip the last 3 stitches of each row, turn, and slipstitch through the first 3 stitches of the next row.
To make a half double crochet 2 together (hdc2tog), (yarn over and insert the hook in the next stitch, yarn over, and draw up a loop) twice, then yarn over and pull the loop through all 3 loops on the hook.

To make a half double crochet 2 together (hdc2tog), (yarn over and insert the hook in the next stitch, yarn over, and draw up a loop) twice, then yarn over and pull the loop through all 3 loops on the hook.

Photo: Linda Permann

This week we'll crochet the last piece for the hoodie: the hood! If you've just joined in or need to catch up, refer to Week 1, Week 2, and Week 3 for step-by-step instructions on making the back, front, and sleeves.

Step 1: Make the hood.

Referring to the Sweet Baby Hoodie pattern, chain the indicated numbers of stitches and work 3 rows of half double crochet. Turn, ch 2, and start the next row with a decrease. The decrease is called a half double crochet 2 together—esentially it means you're combining two stitches into one (therefore decreasing the number of stitches in the row).


To make a half double crochet 2 together (hdc2tog), (yarn over and insert the hook in the next stitch, yarn over, and draw up a loop) twice, then yarn over and pull the loop through all 3 loops on the hook.

Hdc in the rest of the stitches of the row until you get to the last 2. Make another hdc2tog over the last 2 stitches and turn. You'll repeat this decrease row (with a hdc2tog at the beginning and end of the row) several times until your stitch count matches the pattern. If you'd like to determine how many repeats you'll need before you get started, take the number of stitches in the foundation row for your size (75 for 6 months) and subtract the final number for your size (59 for 6 months) = 16 stitches. Divide that number by 2, which is the number of stitches you'll eliminate through decreases, and you'll get the number of decrease rows you need to work for your size. It will be 8 rows for the 6-month size.

After the decrease rows, work even as the pattern indicates, ending at the end of a wrong side row (so that the right side is facing for the next row). Do not chain 2 before turning.

Step 2: Shape the hood, beginning with the next row.


To begin shaping, slipstitch in the first 3 stitches of the next row. To make a slipstitch, insert the hook in the stitch, yarn over, and draw the loop through both the stitch and the loop on your hook.

After the third slipstitch, work one half double crochet across until you reach the last 3 stitches of the previous row. Turn and leave these stitches unworked. Repeat this row 5 more times, beginning each row with 3 slipstitches and ending 3 stitches before the end of the previous row. This will give you a pretty rapid decrease in the hood's width.


In subsequent rows, skip the last 3 stitches of each row, turn, and slipstitch through the first 3 stitches of the next row.

That's it! After you've completed a total of 6 decrease rows, fasten off.


Here's what the completed hood looks like when laid flat.

Next week we'll move on to finishing, which includes making a button band and sewing all of the pieces together. If you want to get a head start, weave in the ends and block your pieces now. Use a stitch marker or stray piece of yarn to mark the right side of each piece before you weave in the ends. For blocking, if you're working with natural fibers (cotton, wool) that can be steam blocked, refer to my blocking tutorial here. If you're working with acrylic/synthetic fibers, remember not to steam them. You can follow the same basic rules of pinning the pieces to size, then spritz them with a water bottle and let them dry overnight. Your pieces might be fine without any blocking, but if you have two sleeves or fronts that look slightly different in size, the blocking process will straighten them out.

See you next week!

Note: For easy reference for those of you just joining, here's the pattern we're using: Sweet Baby Hoodie. If you need to catch up, click over to: Week 1, Week 2, Week 3, and Week 4, and Week 5.

*******

See more of my projects on my personal blog, and look for my new book, Crochet Adorned, in stores August 11, 2009.

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Comments (6)

vantino56 writes: I made this sweater and i'm having trouble putting it together. It is the first sweater i ever made. What end of the hood do i sew to the sweater? Do you have the sweater pattern on video that would help me. I so want to finish this sweater because i am very excite about it. Could you please help me?
Posted: 9:24 pm on August 29th
shashu writes: Hi Linda,

Thank You so much for the detailed info as it so much easy to understand
Posted: 7:24 am on June 28th
Sherly writes: Hey Linda,

Thanks so much for your intrusions. I am starting to learn crocheting and having problem in baby hoodie step. I could not image which each side in your pictures to pin/attach the hood of neckline. All of step is well for me so far.

I am not native speaker; hope you can understand my poor writing English. Looking forward to your explanation.

Thanks,

Sherly


Posted: 1:01 am on November 10th
DIYMaven writes: Thanks Linda. That looks better!
Posted: 10:30 am on November 10th
LindaPermann writes: DIYMaven-
Well, after crocheting the button bands and trying to put things together, I realized that the quick corners on the collar actually shouldn't be crocheted over for the button band (i.e. just work the stitches over the straight part of the center of each front, not the diagonal, then the hood fits right in to the diagonals and will make up for the extra width of the bands). Is that what you're asking? I also added the edging after I sewed everything together, because yes- the pattern left a little something to be desired in the explanation. I will go through it step by step next week if you can wait- but let me know if you have more questions.
Posted: 8:21 pm on November 8th
DIYMaven writes: Linda, I was wondering how you're interpreting the hood attachment. The pattern says to 'beg at center of button or buttonhole bands', which is fine, except when working the edging. Those 2 quick corners--one inside and one outside--at the top of the bands make things a little wonky, IMO. Also, have you noticed there's no mention of adding trim to the back bottom? That seems rather odd. It would have made more sense if the pattern said to sew in the arms and side seams and
then make the edging.
Posted: 3:30 pm on November 7th
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