How to Knit an Easy Holiday Ornament Adornment

comments (7) December 10th, 2014     

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Tina_Hilton Tina Hilton, contributor
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Turn an ordinary ball ornament into an heirloom with this beautiful knitted cover.
Now you know what an authentic sugarplum looks like.
 A 9-1/2-inch ball would work, too.
Turn an ordinary ball ornament into an heirloom with this beautiful knitted cover.

Turn an ordinary ball ornament into an heirloom with this beautiful knitted cover.

Photo: Tina Hilton

"While visions of sugarplums danced in their heads…" -Clement C. Moore

As soon as I saw this yummy Tilli Thomas yarn, it reminded me of the perennial holiday symbol, the sugarplum, made famous in The Nutcracker ballet and our favorite holiday poem T'was the Night before Christmas. This handcrafted holiday gift will never be out of style, outgrown, or out of sight. A perfect mini take-along project, these ornaments are so quick and easy you will want to make several to bestow on all your favorite friends and family.

  Now you know what an authentic sugarplum looks like.

 

Supplies

• A clear glass ornament, 8-1/2 inches in diameter (a colored ball in either a matching or contrasting color would also work)

  A 9-1/2-inch ball would work, too.

• Yarn: Tilly Thomas Beaded Lace 100% silk

  Lux yarn company Tilly Thomas makes yarn that looks good enough to eat!

This yarn comes in a 165-yard skein, and I used the color Strawberry Dip. You should be able to knit three or four ornaments from one skein. Other good choices may be SWTC sequined Yang or Artyarns Beaded Silk. This is also a great project to use up leftover bits of variegated/hand-painted yarns you have on hand.

• Double-pointed needles size US 3 (depending on the yarn weight used, you may wish to adjust your needle size)

• Tapestry needle

Abbreviations
DPN: set of double-pointed needles
K2 tog: knit two together
Sts: stitches
YO: yarn over

Step by Step
Cast on 36 sts, leaving an 8-inch tail, and evenly distribute on three needles.

  Distribute your cast-on stitches evenly on the three DPN's.

I used a double strand of the Tilly Thomas Beaded Lace to bring me up to a DK weight. I also took into consideration the size ornament I had to work with to determine the number of stitches to cast on. If I were using only one strand, I would cast on 48 stitches.

  At the begining of the first round, place the needles parallel to make the first yarn over so you don't have a big gap.

Round 1: Knit.

Round 2: *YO, K2 tog. Repeat from * around.

  Check your fit to avoid disappointment.

Repeat rounds 1 and 2 until the piece measures around 2-1/2 inches.

  A size of 2-1/2 inches will cover the ball.

K2 tog around two rows.

Finishing
Cut the yarn and leave a 6-inch tail. Slide the beads off the tail to make it easier to close up the top. Thread a tapestry needle, and pull through the stitches while you are removing the DPN's. 

  Thread the needle through the stitches before putting the cover on the ball.

Slip the ornament cover over the ball and tighten up the stitches around the top. 

  You should close the top tight enough that it fits snugly around the top.

Weave in the tail.

Slide the beads off the cast-on tail, then thread the tapestry needle to work through the cast-on stitches.

  Close the bottom by working through the cast-on stitches.

Pull tightly to close and weave in the tail.

I bet you can't make just one! Please log in and share your creation with all of us!

Knit happy!

Check out more enchanting fibres from the original embellished yarn company, Tilli Thomas.

Pattern inspired by Knox Socks Designs free pattern Knitted Christmas Ornament Covers by Judy Sumner.

See all of Phil Gyford's images on Flickr.

posted in: christmas ornament, Knitted ornament, beaded yarn

Comments (7)

Uzannesay writes: Do you mean an 8 1/2inch circumference ball? Because all I can find are balls that are about 2inches in diameter unless I want a glass globe that goes on a lamp.
Posted: 9:28 pm on November 13th
Tina_Hilton writes: 1 cup raisins
1 cup bite-size pitted prunes
1 cup dates 1 cup currants
1 cup candied cherries, dried cherries, or dried cranberries
1 cup walnuts
1/2 to 3/4 cup confectioners' sugar (granulated sugar)

Using a meat grinder or a food processor, grind the fruit and nuts and mix well. Work into the mixture as much confectioners' sugar as it takes to form 1-inch balls. Roll in granulated sugar, then place on a rack to dry for 24 hours.

Thanks to Phil Gyford the clever man who shared his photograph we now have the recipe too!
Posted: 2:13 pm on December 16th
Jen1964 writes: By the way, do you have the recipe for the sugarplums you showed? I always wondered how to do them and since we love fruitcake, it's likely to be a blast. Thanks.
Posted: 10:21 am on December 13th
Jen1964 writes: You've got my attention. Handmade and natural are our preferences for our tree - and ornament making has become a fun part of the Advent season here. Then seeing the handmade stuff calls back peaceful memories and inspires calm amid the clamor. I can't imagine how many people would love to get one of your knitted wonders (or a set of 4) for a extravagant present. Money isn't what makes things extravagant, you know. It's love. Funny thing, too, when the collection of ornaments grows too much, there's always someone who needs some-like fire victims, or family members going out on their own, or community projects and fundraisers. Things aren't meant to be hoarded, but rather shared.
Posted: 10:19 am on December 13th
ewephoric writes: perfect gift or decoration!
Posted: 7:25 pm on December 4th
Tina_Hilton writes: Time won't allow me to make a treeful but you can bet I will whip out a few more for holiday gifts! As for the sugarplums, not sure I will get around to making a batch of those!
Posted: 6:48 am on November 20th
SMVG writes: Tina,
You've shared another winning project! I can picture a tree adorned with many of these treasures. P.S. The sugar plums looked delicious!
Thanks
Posted: 12:14 pm on November 15th
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