Try Free-Motion Stitching and Make an Eyeglass Case

comments (0) June 14th, 2008     

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MaryRay Mary Ray, contributor
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Before I created this simple eyeglass case project, I had never really tried to write using free-motion. It really was fun once I got used to it.
You might want to practice stitching and writing on a scrap of fabric before you create the stitching lines on your case.
I used a simple snap to prevent my glasses from falling out, but you can use any closure you prefer.
Before I created this simple eyeglass case project, I had never really tried to write using free-motion. It really was fun once I got used to it.

Before I created this simple eyeglass case project, I had never really tried to write using free-motion. It really was fun once I got used to it.

Photo: Mary Ray

Practice makes perfect I know, but I don’t always want to take the time to do samples. I just want to dive in and learn as I go along; however, it’s a good idea—especially when you’re learning something like free-motion stitching —to do some practice samples before you start on a larger project. I’ve been known to rip out rows of quilting stitches because I wasn’t happy with the result. It isn't fun. Maybe a little practice time on a scrap would have saved me the agony.

If you checked out the sites I mentioned in my posts on hand and machine stitching, you’ve had a lesson in both. So get out some muslin and try your hand at it! This is an easy project that you will give you a feel for using the free-motion technique to quilt.

What you’ll need:
Two pieces of muslin (the size will depend on how big or small you decide to make your pattern)
One piece of batting that will fit between the two muslin pieces
One piece of fabric (for lining)
A snap (closure)
Beads, buttons, or other embellishments (optional)

To Make:

Step 1: Make a sandwich of two pieces of muslin and a piece of batting that will accommodate the pattern for the case.


Here is the pattern that I created. After I drew it out, I copied it onto the muslin.

Step 2: Trace the shape onto the muslin. Press and pin in a few places to hold the layers together.

Step 3 : Practice stitching within the traced lines. Or if you have a sample you’ve already made, trace the pattern onto your sample.


You might want to practice stitching and writing on a scrap of fabric before you create the stitching lines on your case.

Step 4:Cut a piece of fabric the same shape for the lining.

Step 5: With right sides together, pin the stitched piece to the lining, and stitch along the curved top from dot to dot with a 1/4-inch seam.


After you have pinned the lining to the free-motion piece, stitch along 1/4 inch from the top curved edge from mark to mark.

Step 6: Clip the seam at intervals along the curves.


To create some ease in the curved edges, make little clips as shown. This will help the edges to lie flat.

Step 7: Turn the fabric right-side out and press.

Step 8: Fold the fabric in half lengthwise with the stitched piece to the inside. Pin raw edges together along side and bottom and stitch with a 1/4-inch seam.

Step 9: Zigzag stitch along the raw edges to finish the seam.

Step 10: Turn the case right side out.

Step 11: Add a snap to the inside, and embellish with buttons or beads or more stitching if you like.


I used a simple snap to keep my glasses from falling out, but you can create whatever closure works best for you.
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posted in: eyeglass case, free motion stitching

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