The Laton Jacket Revisited

comments (0) June 21st, 2008     

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JenniferStern Jennifer Stern, contributor
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Here is a skein of indigo silk thread that will be used to weave the lining for the Laton Jacket. Visit The Embroiderers Story to see how this skein of silk ends up on a spool.

Here is a skein of indigo silk thread that will be used to weave the lining for the Laton Jacket. Visit The Embroiderers' Story to see how this skein of silk ends up on a spool.

Photo: Justin.....

I was thinking about the Laton Jacket that I blogged about a few months ago, and I decided to check in to see the progress being made on this exciting project. Arriving at The Embroiderers' Story, a blog dedicated not only to the progress of the Laton Jacket but all things cool and crafty at the Plimoth Plantation, I was surprised to see that they were starting on the lining for the coat. I know this is a re-creation of an original 17th-century jacket, but it didn't occur to me that they would actually be weaving the silk fabric that will be used as the lining. I glanced over to a pile of fabric on my cutting table, and I couldn't imagine weaving even the smallest piece, let alone the 6 yards of fabric that are needed to line the jacket.

That's a lot of thread to manage! This silk thread starts out in large skeins that are vat-dyed, dried, and spooled for warping...the first step (of many) to get the loom ready. The two kinds of threads needed for weaving are the warp (vertical threads) and the weft (horizontal threads). Warp threads are wound onto a warping board or frame, then transferred to a loom. The warping board used to make the warp for the lining is 6 feet across. The thread travels from nine hand-wound spools held on a scarn across the warping board four times and finally runs down 1/2 yard to make the lower corner. This makes the warp 8-1/2 yards long, which is 2-1/2 yards more than is needed for the lining, but some will get eaten up by the loom, and it's always good to have too much than not enough—especially when you're weaving your own fabric! I am fascinated by the process of weaving fabric from scratch. Even though this is technically not embroidery related, there is thread involved, so I thought you might be interested, too!

posted in: embroidery, weaving, plimoth plantation, warp, laton jacket

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