How to Knit a Buttony Chevron Cuff

comments (3) February 21st, 2014     

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leethal Lee Meredith, contributor
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For this cuff, I chose to use small, simple buttons on the two sides, with a bigger matching one in the center.
Three simple metal buttons look nice on the busy, variegated colors, whereas colorful buttons might have been too much.
I like how this one pulls a little, making the narrow holes between the buttons.
For this cuff, I chose to use small, simple buttons on the two sides, with a bigger matching one in the center.

For this cuff, I chose to use small, simple buttons on the two sides, with a bigger matching one in the center.

Photo: Lee Meredith

I like to use both strands of each loop as the buttonholes, as it feels more secure this way, meaning that the loops need to be large enough to pull the whole thing over the button. The loop would be able to fit over larger buttons if you were to only pull one strand, making the buttonhole about twice as big. Keep this in mind when creating the buttonholes during the bind-off-I think it's best to try to make them big enough to work with both strands of the loops, and if they turn out too small, you can always make them bigger by using only one strand.

  These buttonhole loops are somewhat small, so I had to choose small buttons, which was fine since it's a narrow cuff.

Choose your buttons, and make sure they fit through the holes. Sew them onto the two edges and to the point of the cast-on edge using your yarn if possible-make sure they are on tight, then tie and weave in all your ends.

  For this cuff, I chose to use small, simple buttons on the two sides, with a bigger matching one in the center.

I like to sew the buttons on using the cast-on tail, weaving it through the stitches to bring it from one button to the next, so there is only that one end to weave in when I'm done. Be careful to tie each button on tightly if you do this-if the buttons pull and are not secure, this method may cause the cast-on edge to buckle due to the connecting yarn.

  Three simple metal buttons look nice on the busy, variegated colors, whereas colorful buttons might have been too much.

My original prototype of this pattern was knit with cotton yarn (I think on size 8 needles), and I used two identical blue buttons on the sides, with a matching shiny blue button in the center.

  I like how this one pulls a little, making the narrow holes between the buttons.

And in case you were wondering, here are the yarns I used on all three examples:

  • Narrow example: Merino 5 by Crystal Palace
  • Wide example: TLC Essentials Multi acrylic
  • Cotton example: Sugar 'n Cream by Lily
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posted in: Jewelry, bracelet, wearable, yarn, buttons, knit, cuff, wrist

Comments (3)

Latefa writes: I love your work! =D
I still need to learn the chavron stitch =(
wish there was a video showing you making these cuffs =D
Posted: 12:43 am on April 21st
leethal writes: there are actually abbreviation descriptions above the pattern. kfb means "Knit into the front of the stitch, then into the back of the same stitch, to increase 1 stitch." if you need more help you can see sites like knittinghelp.com. hope that helps!
Posted: 9:22 pm on March 14th
Merilyn writes: In the knitting instructions what does kfb mean????? It would be nice if there were explanations for abbreviations. I know some knitting abbreviations but not all.
Posted: 3:20 pm on March 14th
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