Vickie Howell Shares Ways to Keep Knitting in This Economy

comments (4) April 20th, 2009     

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LindaPermann Linda Permann, contributor
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I recently combined all of the DK-weight cotton and silk in my stash to make this granny blanket. I purchased one ball of cotton in turquoise to finish it off—which made my total cost about $10 to complete the projecet.

I recently combined all of the DK-weight cotton and silk in my stash to make this granny blanket. I purchased one ball of cotton in turquoise to finish it off—which made my total cost about $10 to complete the projecet.

Photo: Linda Permann

If you've been trying to back away from your local yarn shop for fear of blowing your budget on your next project, head on over to Vickie Howell's latest list of ways to keep on knitting in this economy. She has great suggestions about remaking old projects that didn't come out as you planned, ways to continue to support pattern designers without going over your budget, and how to consider your yarn purchases so you get the most bang for your buck. Thanks Vickie, for a great compilation of ideas!

I have a few more suggestions you can also try. First, if you want to take Vickie's suggestion of unravelling thift-store sweaters for their yarn, check out the step-by-step photos in Lee  Meredith's awesome tutorial. And second, try to combine yarn in your stash with something new. For example, if you have three balls of a boring DK weight in a color that doesn't excite you (such as white), buy one or two colors of similar yarn to mix in and make the old yarn fun again. This is what I have been doing lately; that way, I can use up my stash while still being excited about the project—and I don't break the bank.

How about you? Share your money-saving craft tips in the comments.

posted in: vickie howell, how to save money on yarn

Comments (4)

Mountaingrandma writes: I go to yard sales during the warm weather. There have been many times I have gotten yarn and material at such a low price, I nearly danced out to the car! I also haunt the second hand stores. Some of the second hand stores will save some yarn or material for you if you are making it for the needy or home bound people. Don't be shy in asking. Maybe they will do that for you too.
Posted: 4:45 pm on March 23rd
kissamew writes: In Arizona the weather is too warm for wool, too. But... luckily students from all over attend U of A and since the weather is what it is, they sell their too-warm clothes or donate. Plus, for us thin-blooded, we get the benefit of toasty if we thrift too. There are so pretty cool stores around campuses, try those if you haven't before!
Posted: 11:31 pm on September 13th
Breeze530 writes: Unfortunately, for me, finding natural fiber sweaters in thrift shops doesn't work. I live in sunny California, CA (USA) & the wool just isn't there because of our nice weather.

I do have some suggestions of things I've been doing lately though. I bought huge balls (for cheap) of decent bedspread weight crochet cotton in Natural. I've been crocheting a v-neck sweater with it & plan to embellish it with tiny thread flowers & leaves. But before I embellish it I'm going to dye the finished garment myself. It's always cheaper to buy thread in big cones that usually only come in white or ecru. The small balls of thread for the flowers are cheap because I need so little thread for them & I already have some colors in my stash.

I've also been crocheting flowers for a neck-piece from DMC embroidery thread. It's very cheap (US 39 cents) & comes in hundreds of beautiful colors.
Posted: 5:09 pm on April 25th
sarahjoaustin writes: What about a yarn exchange? Everyone has yarn leftover from old projects. Get your knitting and crocheting friends together, throw your balls of yarn on a table, and go to town picking out some new colors for your stash.
Posted: 1:37 pm on April 21st
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