Make a Tyvek Shopper Tutorial

comments (6) July 10th, 2008     

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LLee Linda Lee, contributor
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This tote uses house wrap, cotton fabric, webbing, and ribbon for accents.
Use the edge of your presser foot as a guide to sew an even distance from the edge.
Do not iron the Tyvek® unless you want a crinkled look. Experiment first.
This tote uses house wrap, cotton fabric, webbing, and ribbon for accents.

This tote uses house wrap, cotton fabric, webbing, and ribbon for accents.

Photo: Linda Lee
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House wrap-it's common, it's cheap, and it's cool. This tote bag incorporates the bold graphics of house wrap (we know it as Tyvek®) as its outer coating along with some fun cotton fabrics, webbing, and ribbon for accents.

The bag measures 14 inches wide x 15 inches tall. The Tyvek® forms external pockets, which are trimmed with fabric binding. Ribbon-clad webbing and a swivel/clip closure through a decorative grommet make this tote bag easy to carry and secure.

Click here for another easy-to-sew Tyvek tote bag from Linda Lee.

What You'll Need:

1 repeat (about 1-1/2 yards) of Tyvek® house wrap
1 yard of fabric for the bag
1 yard of fabric for the lining
1/2 yard of contrasting fabric for the binding
1-2/3 yards of 1-1/2-inch-wide natural cotton webbing
1-2/3 yards of 1-inch-wide ribbon
1 large decorative eyelet
1 swivel clip
1-2/3 yards of fusible web tape
Thread
Sewing machine

Preparation:
Cut two pieces of Tyvek® 15 inches wide x 10-1/2 inches tall
Cut two pieces of bag fabric 15 inches wide x 16 inches
Cut two pieces of lining fabric 15 inches wide x 16 inches
Cut two pieces of contrasting fabric 18 inches on the bias (the diagonal)
Cut two pieces of webbing 22 inches long
Cut one piece of webbing 12 inches long
Cut two pieces of ribbon 22 inches long
Cut two pieces of ribbon 12 inches long

Construction:

Use 1/2-inch seam allowances.

1. With right sides together, sew one strip of bias contrasting fabric to the top edge of each Tyvek® piece.

  Use the edge of your presser foot as a guide to sew an even distance from the edge.

2. Finger-press the bias strip up and away from the Tyvek®. Fold the strip to the back side, binding the edge, and stitch in the well of the seam, catching the bias strip on the wrong side of the Tyvek®. Bind the top edges of both Tyvek® pieces. Trim the ends of the bias even with the Tyvek®.

  Do not iron the Tyvek® unless you want a crinkled look. Experiment first.

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posted in: tote, bag, Tyvek

Comments (6)

gingerd writes: What a great way too use an unusual material. I won't look at building material the same way.
Posted: 1:04 am on June 28th
eveh writes: Well, I will be haunting construction sites to see if I can find a piece of this. We probably used it when we redid the siding on our house. I'll bet I threw some away.. Goes to show you, if you craft, don't throw anything away. LOL

I love your bag.
Posted: 4:04 pm on September 13th
sassysewer writes: This bag just makes me laugh! I love it! It's imaginative and fun. Gotta find me some Tyvek....
Posted: 2:54 pm on September 9th
TycheNitely writes: I could use a sturdy bag and this looks like a winner.
Now to find the Tyvek...
Posted: 1:28 pm on July 16th
ManKnit writes: Tyvek is underwrap for the siding on your house. You can buy it at Lowes or HD or most local hardware stores (and it is is made by other manufacturers as well under the generic name, housewrap).

It comes in a role big enough to cover the side of an entire house, so unless you want to make 1,000 of these tote bags, your best bet is to find a scrap of it. If a house is being resided or remodeled in your neighborhood, the carpenter should have some laying around.
Posted: 8:05 am on July 11th
halfaperfectpair writes: I love the look of this bag! Where can you buy Tyvek??

Danielle
Posted: 2:39 pm on July 10th
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