How to Sew an Extra Layer in Your Garments For Added Warmth

comments (3) December 3rd, 2009     

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Create a cute, cozy jacket by winterizing a lightweight jacket pattern such as Simplicity SewStylish 2570 shown here.
Eco-friendly fabrics are not just good “green” choices; the “give” of the natural fibers can flatter your figure as well.
Synthetic-fiber insulation such as Thinsulate and Primaloft comes in a variety of weights and thicknesses. Choose a lightweight variety for a jacket suitable for warmer weather.
Create a cute, cozy jacket by winterizing a lightweight jacket pattern such as Simplicity SewStylish 2570 shown here.

Create a cute, cozy jacket by winterizing a lightweight jacket pattern such as Simplicity SewStylish 2570 shown here.

Photo: Jack Deutsch

Sometimes, you wish a fabulous jacket pattern and fabric you bought for spring could produce a warmer garment that could carry you all the way through the chilly fall and winter months, but often, the fabric is just too light.

This is the time to explore the miracle of interlining—a layer of insulation you insert between the lining and fashion fabric when you make a jacket. Interlining effectively traps air between the layers and holds body heat.

As companies turn down their thermostats to conserve energy, even winter fabrics may not be up to the task of keeping you warm indoors. To make any jacket warmer, all you need is three layers: interlining, a fabulous fabric, and coordinating lining.

 

Choose the Right Type

Identify the best interlining for the job, so your jacket can take you anywhere you want to go.

Don’t confuse lining and interlining. Lining is the thin layer of fabric that hides interior seams and finishing details in a garment; it’s slick so it slides against other fabrics. Interlining is the insulation layer between the surface fabric and the lining; it traps air and retains body heat. Some of the most popular trademarked synthetic interlining products are Thinsulate by 3M and Primaloft, but natural-fiber interlining materials are also available.

Thinsulate is a blend of 55-percent olefin fiber and 45-percent polyester that comes in a variety of weights and thicknesses. These thermal products have a nonwoven layer on one or both sides to hold the fibers in place. They are washable and dry cleanable.

Primaloft contains a patented microfiber that retains heat. It’s, breathable, water repellent, and as warm as down. Primaloft One is made entirely of specially treated microfibers that have the softest hand; it’s available in two weights.


Eco-friendly fabrics are not just good “green” choices; the “give” of the natural fibers can flatter your figure as well. Both are available at Greenberg-Hammer.

 


Synthetic-fiber insulation such as Thinsulate and Primaloft comes in a variety of weights and thicknesses. Choose a lightweight variety for a jacket suitable for warmer weather. All shown here are available at Seattle Fabrics.

 

Add the Interlining

Interlining just the body will warm up any jacket, but if you want extra warmth, interline the sleeves as well.

1. Cut out the body and lining patterns. Then, cut the interlining from just the major garment pattern pieces: the front, back, and sleeves (optional). You don’t need to interline facings, cuffs, or collars.

 

2. Attach the interlining to the fashion fabric before you sew the main garment seams together. The object is to hold the interlining to the fabric just long enough to get the seams sewn. The traditional method is to hand-baste around or through the layers from the wrong side, back, shoulder seams, and any other major horizontal or vertical seams. But you could also use temporary spray adhesive to hold the layers together.

 

3. Trim the seam allowances. Very close to the seamline, trim only the interlining. This eliminates the bulk a double layer adds.

 

4. Sew the darts through both layers. Then, use small scissors to cut away the interlining layer to expose them, as shown below.

 

Finish the Garment

If your pattern does not have lining, use the jacket pattern. The pattern shown didn’t call for a lining, but its design makes it easy to add one.

1. Cut and bag the lining. Use the front, back, and sleeve pieces to cut the lining. To install the lining, sew the same seams as you did on the jacket, but leave one 5-inch opening along a side seam. Sew in the sleeves on both sides. Cut 1 inch off the lining cuff and body hems. Then, with right sides together and the jacket and lining aligned, machine-sew the cuff edges and lower hem edges. Turn the layers to the right side, and press. Press the hems. The lining will fold slightly over the garment hem.

Hand sew the opening closed.

 

Excerpted from "Interlining Basics" by Ariel Price in SewStylish Fall Fashion 2009.

 

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posted in: sewstylish feature, SewStylish, scissors, sewstylish technique, interlining

Comments (3)

sltboop writes: DO I HAVE TO CUT THE PATTERN BIGGER TO ALLOW FOR THE LINING IF THE PATTERN DOES NOT CALL FOR ONE THANKYOU
Posted: 12:02 pm on December 10th
AHH writes: Sorry, but the last section of this tutorial, which is how to assemble all 3 parts, outer fabric, interlining, and lining, together, needs more clarity. Such as, what is the 5" opening on the lining's side seam for, turning the garment right side out? And a bit more explanation is needed for the sleeves - if the lining sleeves are sewn to the lining body, what does "Sew in the sleeves on both sides" all about?
Posted: 10:25 am on December 10th
TeacherTeacher writes: i wonder if i could adapt this to not only add a layer of warmth but also to add that layered look without the bulk?
Posted: 3:34 pm on December 8th
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