How to Make a Coin Purse

comments (6) January 8th, 2010     

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Deana Deana May, editor
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Photo: Sloan Howard
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Every sewer undoubtedly has one: a stash of fabric a mile high just waiting to be used up. And if you’re a thrifty sewer, you probably have a few items you just haven’t fi gured out what to do with yet. For me, it was a broken umbrella with a too-cute-for-words fabric that I just couldn’t bear to part with. Then it hit me: why not make a chic little coin purse from this adorable print?

In this article, I’ll show you how to create your own coin-purse pattern and sew up cute (and if made from umbrella fabric, water-resistant) change purses from your fabric leftovers. You’ll also learn how to apply a metal snap purse frame. Quick and easy to sew, these purses make super gifts. Depending on the size of the purse frame you choose, you can also create makeup bags, pencil cases, and more. (You can bet I’ll be doing that with the rest of my umbrella fabric.) And, if you make them from fabric scraps, you’ll get that little glow of pride knowing you’ve used up every last piece.

What You'll Need:

• Fabric scraps for outside and lining fabric (We used fabric from a broken umbrella.)
• Heavyweight interfacing
• Iron
• Metal snap purse frames (TallPoppyCraft.com, Lacis.com, or reclaimed from an old, unwanted purse)
• Pressing cloth
• Scissors
• Thread to match

Salvage fabric to make cute little purses
If you already have a broken umbrella you’ve been saving, now’s the time to get it out! Or, you can troll the thrift stores for used umbrellas. If you’re using fabric scraps, skip to step 2.

1. Remove the fabric from the umbrella. Cut the tiny threads that hold the umbrella fabric to the umbrella apparatus so the fabric pulls away in one piece. To remove wrinkles, use a pressing cloth to lightly press your fabric on a low temperature.


Remove the fabric from the umbrella.


2. Trace the frame.
Place the purse frame on pattern paper, and trace around the outside of the frame. Mark the bottom of the frame hinges. Then, draw the desired shape of your purse. You can make it any size you wish. Here, we added 1⁄2 inch around the outside of the frame. Angle the sides of the bag to give it some more space, if you desire.


Trace the frame.


3. Cut out the fabric and start sewing.
Using your pattern, cut two pieces from the fabric, two from the lining, and two from the heavyweight interfacing. Place your fabric right sides together between the layers of interfacing. Mark the placement of the snapframe hinges on the interfacing.


Cut out the fabric and start sewing.


4. Sew and trim. Sew down the sides of the fabric and interfacing piece. Then sew along the bottom from mark to mark. Trim a 1⁄4-inch seam allowance around only the sewn area. Sew the lining the same way, except leave a 1-inch opening in the bottom to turn the lining later on.


5. Apply the lining.
Turn the fabric and interfacing piece right-side out, pushing out the corners. Next, with right sides together, place the fabric piece inside the lining. At the top edge, sew one side of the lining to the fabric piece, using a 1⁄4-inch seam allowance and starting close to the previous sewing. Repeat on the other side. Do not trim the seam allowance. This gives the top of the bag some strength as you later insert it into the
metal purse frame.


Apply the lining.


6. Turn the lining to the inside.
Pull the fabric through the opening in the lining, and turn the lining rightside out. Topstitch the bottom of the lining closed. Then push the lining into the bag. You should now have a clean finish at the top of the bag.


Turn the lining to the inside.


7. Apply the purse frame.
Set your iron on a low temperature, and press your seams lightly. If you have a sew-on frame (as shown), hand-stitch the frame to the bag. If there are no holes in the frame to sew through, apply a little heavy-duty fabric glue inside the frame, and insert the purse into the frame. You may need to use a flat-head screwdriver to push the fabric into the frame. Let the glue dry.


Apply the purse frame.

excerpted from CraftStylish Restyle, p. 75

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posted in: interfacing, purse frames, pressing cloth

Comments (6)

wharrison writes: I think I will try this tomorrow!
Posted: 10:37 pm on August 20th
HallieHandy writes: I haven't made them this way, sewn in I mean. I made larger ones and glued the frame. I used the tutorial and metal purse frames I got from www.AmericanPurseSupplies.com
My very first one came out awesome! Easy and fun!
Posted: 12:03 pm on June 10th
Wificus writes: I'd really appreciate if someone can clarify step 5. It says: "Turn the fabric and interfacing piece right-side out, pushing out the corners. Next, with right sides together, place the fabric piece inside the lining. At the top edge, sew one side of the lining to the fabric piece, using a 1⁄4-inch seam allowance and starting close to the previous sewing. Repeat on the other side."
So when I place the fabric/interfacing piece inside the lining the rights sides are together, correct? And then according to the picture, it looks like I sew them together & in step 6 it says I will have a "clean edge at the top" but if I sew them together, where is the opening to the purse? I already made two purses, and these directions really confused me, so I deviated from them at step 5. I'd love to know what the creator was doing though.
Thanks.
Posted: 9:47 pm on December 8th
wenger05 writes: hahaahaha, firstly, we need a purse frame.

http://www.bagisgood.com/purse-frame/4cm.htm
Posted: 6:24 am on May 15th
WoodPondDesigns writes: I love making little purses and this looks like a fun project.
Posted: 9:05 pm on January 20th
berkley123 writes: tooooooo cute
Posted: 11:16 am on January 9th
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