How to Make Fabric Envelopes

comments (3) September 7th, 2008     

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FriendyWendy Wendy Sloneker, contributor
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I scored a 1930s vintage quilt from a thrift store. The middle was rotted, but the sides were ready for more action and new life. It took longer than the no-fray fabric version, and I love it!
Fast and no-fraying felt version. Cut to a quick chase by using the angle lines on the mat to cut points at each end: one inverted and one pointed out.
I used red for my topstitch and black in the bobbin, then flipped the project to switch up the color and add more texture.
I scored a 1930s vintage quilt from a thrift store. The middle was rotted, but the sides were ready for more action and new life. It took longer than the no-fray fabric version, and I love it!

I scored a 1930s vintage quilt from a thrift store. The middle was rotted, but the sides were ready for more action and new life. It took longer than the no-fray fabric version, and I love it!

Photo: Wendy Sloneker

These fabric envelopes can be made in any size. The idea here is that the fabric will be folded into thirds to create the envelope. Stitch up the sides and affix a closure in a snap!

Materials:
• Fabric (for a quick project, choose a no-fray fabric like felt, vinyl, or Ultrasuede)
• Rotary cutter and mat
• Ruler
• Scissors
• Sewing machine
• Embroidery floss and needle for the quilted version
• Optional: closure of choice (snaps, hook-and-loop tape, magnetic closure), buttons, beads, patches, ephemera, pinking shears

 

Vintage 1930's Fabric Envelope


 

I scored a 1930s vintage quilt from a thrift store. The middle was rotted, but the sides were ready for more action and new life.

For longer crafternoon sessions, use up your scraps to make a quilted version. I scored a 1930s Around the World quilt at a thrift store—it was rotted in the middle, but the sides were perfectly good for repurposing. I salvaged a 14-inch x 6-inch strip, machine- and hand-sewed the binding on, then sewed up the sides with embroidery floss via the whipstitch.

For a faster project, choose a no-fray fabric like felt, vinyl, or Ultrasuede. For quick "felt-velopes," I cut a sheet of felt to a 6-inch width x 12-inch length, folded it in half lengthwise, and used the angles printed on the cutting mat for even points, then eyeballed the two folds. 

Cut panel points


Fast and no-fraying felt version. Cut to a quick chase by using the angle lines on the mat to cut points at each end: one inverted and one pointed out.

 Place a differrent color thread in your bobbin from the topstitching thread, and you can quickly change colors by flipping the project when you are sewing up the sides.

Two colors: topstitch and bobbin


I used red for my topstitch and black in the bobbin, then flipped the project to switch up the color and add more texture.

This project also offers a great opportunity for practicing hand-stitching, too. Little x's and french knots look super sweet running up the sides.
 
Depending on what you are planning to put into these little sweeties can also determine the size. The envelopes may be added to heirloom treasure troves, glued inside of scrapbooks, or popped into hope chests.
 
For the envelopes you've spent more time on, consider putting in copies of old family photos or keepsakes. These are awesome for wedding mementos, birthday gifts, and cards. 

Practice Gets You a Project


Practice = Project!
I sewed a panel of yellow and orange scraps together and practiced free-motion quilting. I closed up the sides and added a smattering of buttons. Sweet!

 

 

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After you make this project, show off your work to other members!
Post your project in the gallery
 


 
posted in: fabric, keepsake, scrapbook

Comments (3)

Eternal_Clouds writes: cute i might try it
Posted: 11:59 am on March 8th
JennlovesSteve writes: this is so cute! i cannot wait to make some to put gift cards in!
Posted: 10:00 pm on September 15th
sassysewer writes: I can't wait to make one of these. OK, maybe two. My daughters have small games for their portable Nintendo games and these would be great little carriers to keep the games safe. Sounds like an easy project they can help make, also. Thanks for the cute project.
Posted: 2:43 pm on September 9th
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