wtb

Montevallo, AL
member

craft interests: embroidery, gifts, holidays, memory making, paper crafts, restyle, sewing

Member Since: 09/12/2008

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My Sewing Room

The Ultimate Sewing Room contest entry


recent comments

Re: What was your very first sewing project?

My very first sewing project(s) were little stuffed "horsies" that I made for my little brother, James. That was when I was 11 and James was five years old. He had had a stuffed zebra, named Zebie who slept with James and went everywhere with him (even to church). It was covered with striped black and white oil cloth, and my mother had patched it many times. While on vacation in a mountain cabin that had walls between bedrooms that didn't go all the way to the ceiling, but were more like tall, solid log fences, he tossed Zebie over the wall, and into a room to which we had no access. He was heart broken, so when we got home I drew a simple pattern and made him another Zebie out of striped fabric scraps my Mother gave me. Over the next year I must have made him at least three little horses. They were crude, but he loved them, and I learned to run the sewing machine by making them. If truth be known, James probably pines for Zebie to this day--and he is 61 years old.

Re: Sewing Lessons Help Us Preserve the Environment and Get through Hard Times

I love the article on mending and patching. My mother always took great care in patching my brothers' blue jeans. She learned how in sewing classes in high school. She is 94 years old. When my boys were small, she would patch jeans for them also. The boys never minded jeans patched by Granny and got more wear out of them. Also, when they were small land got little holes in their knit shirts, I would buy small iron-on knit patches at the fabric store. You place the patch on the underside of the knit garment, glue side to underside, close the hole together and iron the patch on. You could then take a couple of almost invisible stiches on the outside of the shirt to reinforce the patch. If you do it correctly, it doesn't show, unless you are just looking for it. I don't know if they still sell those small round iron on knit patches, but they sure did come in handy. There is a great satisfaction in mending. But there is a limit. My husband asked me not to mend his socks any more. He does not like the bump from the mending. So years ago quit mending socks.

Re: How To Sew a Classic T-shirt Neckband

Thanks for this article. I have made pjs for my grandsons, but the knitted neckbands always seem to be a mite big. I just follow the pattern directions instead of measuring their necks. Now my pjs will look neater.